TYPES OF BACTERIA WE ELIMINATE:

FUNGAL SPORES – occur in most places like athlete’s foot, from shoes. Humans acquire fungal infection when the fungi are able to pass the resistance barriers in humans. Keep your feet dry as much as possible and out of your shoes when you do not have to wear them. Most spores and definitely your athlete foot spores love dark, warm and moist environments like a foot inside a shoe!

DUST MITES - are the most common cause of allergy from house dust. Dust mites live and multiply easily in warm, humid places. They prefer temperatures at or above 70 degrees Fahrenheit with humidity of 75 to 80 percent. Here's some simple math for you: a single dust mite deposits up to 20 droppings a day, and the average bed is infested with millions of dust mites. You're in bed an average of eight hours per day, so your side by side with an enormous amount of debris that can make you feel as though you haven't been in bed for eight hours.

SALMONELLA - Salmonella bacteria live in the intestines of humans and animals and are excreted in feces.

RHINITIS - In rhinitis, the inflammation of the mucous membrane is caused by viruses, bacteria, irritants or allergens. The most common kind of rhinitis is allergic rhinitis, which is usually triggered by airborne allergens such as pollen and dander. Allergic rhinitis may cause additional symptoms, such as sneezing and nasal itching, coughing, headache, fatigue, malaise, and cognitive impairment. The allergens may also affect the eyes, causing watery, reddened, or itchy eyes and puffiness around the eyes.

MRSA is any strain of Staphylococcus aureus that has developed, through horizontal gene transfer and natural selection, multi- resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, which include the penicillin (methicillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin, oxacillin, etc.) and the cephalosporin’s.

Escherichia coli (e coli) is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium of the genus Escherichia that is commonly found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms (endotherms). Most E. coli strains are harmless, but some serotypes can cause serious food poisoning in their hosts, and are occasionally responsible for product recalls due to food contamination. The harmless strains are part of the normal flora of the gut, and can benefit their hosts by producing vitamin K2, and preventing colonization of the intestine with pathogenic bacteria. E. coli is expelled into the environment within fecal matter. The bacterium grows massively in fresh fecal matter under aerobic conditions for 3 days, but its numbers decline slowly afterwards.